Fri. Nov 26th, 2021
 
What The Return Of Taliban Means For Afghan Women Rights

What The Return Of Taliban Means For Afghan Women Rights

As the Taliban take control of the Afghan capital of Kabul, many women across that nation now fear for their rights and their lives.

 

The Taliban forbid girls from going to school and women from working – or even travelling outside their home alone.

 

“I’m afraid of these things, first of all my life,” Farzana Kochai, a member of the Afghan parliament, said. “For sure I am afraid for myself, my life, my freedom to work and my freedom to speak up.”

According to the United Nations, nearly 250,000 Afghans have fled their homes since the end of May – ahead of western countries withdrawing their troops.

What The Return Of Taliban Means For Afghan Women Rights

What The Return Of Taliban Means For Afghan Women Rights
What The Return Of Taliban Means For Afghan Women Rights

 

80 per cent of the displaced are women and children.

 

Nilofar, a teacher and mother of six, is one of them.

 

Afghans fear that the Taliban will soon impose their strict interpretation of Islam. It would eliminate women’s rights and bring back brutal punishment for those who disobey.

 

Women were predominantly barred from working or studying under the Taliban’s previous Afghan rule between 1996 and 2001 and were confined to their homes unless accompanied by a male guardian.

 

Sharia law is Islam’s legal system, acting as both the fundamental religious moral code of Islam and holistic rules that apply to all areas of life, including religious obligations, daily routines and personal beliefs.

 

The Taliban said earlier this year it wanted a “genuine Islamic system” for Afghanistan that would make provisions for women’s and minority rights, in line with cultural traditions and religious rules.

 

However, the group’s plans to end mixed-gender education and escorting nine women working in a bank home and telling them their male relatives could take their places earlier this month have fueled fears a return to the hardline movement will reverse the past two decades of progress.

 

Women were required to wear burqas and were prevented from accessing healthcare administered by a man under the previous Taliban rule, while girls could not attend school.

 

Malala Yousafzai, who survived being shot by the Taliban in 2012 for promoting women’s education, has implored global leaders to defend the country’s most vulnerable. She tweeted “We watch in complete shock as Taliban takes control of Afghanistan. I am deeply worried about women, minorities and human rights advocates,”

 

“Global, regional and local powers must call for an immediate ceasefire, provide urgent humanitarian aid and protect refugees and civilians.”

 

Subhangee Guha

Break the Newz.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *