Fri. Nov 26th, 2021
 
The Most Complete Map Of Blackholes Captured By German Telescope

The Most Complete Map Of Blackholes Captured By German Telescope

A German-built X-Ray space telescope is developing the greatest detailed map of black holes ever. It is also creating an intricate map of neutron stars across our universe which revealed more than 3 million newfound objects in less than two years.

 

Launched in 2019, the observatory is called eROSITA. This is the first X-Ray based telescope that is capable of imaging the entire sky. It is the main device aboard the Russian-German Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma Mission. It sits in a region known as  Lagrange point 2, which is one of five stable points around the sun-Earth system. At this point, the gravitational forces of the two bodies are in balance. For this very reason, this point enables eROSITA to have a precise and clear view of the universe and this powerful telescope captures photographs with its X-Ray detecting instruments.

The Most Complete Map Of Blackholes Captured By German Telescope

The Most Complete Map Of Blackholes Captured By German Telescope
The Most Complete Map Of Blackholes Captured By German Telescope

 

The pictures collected by the telescope have already led to fascinating discoveries, eg. giant X-Ray bubbles emanating from the centre of the milky way. The team behind eROSITA which is led by scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Germany,  released the very first set of data collected by the telescope to the wider scientific community so that those can be further explored.

 

With its first public science release, eROSITA is expected to sort out some of the long-standing cosmological mysteries which includes the distribution of the impalpable dark energy in the universe. Previous X-rays telescopes like NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory could only observe rather small sections of the sky in one go. But this new German telescope would help in creating a large catalogue that you could then use to study their cosmological evolution. The technical adjustments made by the Max Planck Institute team and their collaborators enable the new telescope to produce images of the same quality as XMM-Newton but over a much larger field of view.

Subhangee Guha

Break the Newz.

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